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The Family Center: enrichment programs for families and professionals

Children Need a Good Night's Sleep (Pt. 2)

Ask the Experts by Helen Landuyt, PhD

To help ease the time transition of daylight savings time, try the following to help your child adjust to the time change: Maintain your child's regular sleep, wake and nap times. Try not to compensate for the lost hour by delaying bedtime or allowing your child to sleep in. This will increase the time it takes to transition.

There may be some crankiness from being tired, but this should last only a day or two.

Make gradual adjustments. Some parents find it best to try and start making adjustments on Friday night rather than wait until Saturday.

Read more: Children Need a Good Night's Sleep (Pt. 2)

 

Children Need a Good Night's Sleep (Pt. 1)

Ask the Experts by Helen Landuyt, PhD

The return to daylight savings time on March 11, 2012 coincided with the final day of National Sleep Awareness week. As our nation springs forward each year, families need to give some real thought about whether you and your children are getting enough sleep.  

Sleep is food for the brain. You want to make sure to get enough of it. There is growing evidence that a chronic lack of sleep can lead to obesity, mimic the symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder and contribute to depression and health problems. Tired kids get lower grades, don't do as well at sports/videogames and have more emotional meltdowns than youngsters who get adequate rest.

Read more: Children Need a Good Night's Sleep (Pt. 1)

 

Women and Heart Attacks

Ask the Experts by Basil M. Dudar, M.D.  

Q:  Our family often has "what-if" discussions to be better prepared in the event of an emergency. We recently had a friend who had a heart attack. What does it mean to have a heart attack?   

A:  A heart attack means the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or completely cut off. Heart attacks can permanently damage the heart's muscle tissue and can be life-threatening events if not treated quickly. 

Q:  Is it true that men and women experience different heart attack symptoms? 

A:  Yes. Not everyone will experience a heart attack the same way. Warning signs of a heart attack can include pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck or back; feeling weak, light-headed or faint; chest pain or discomfort; pain or discomfort in the arms, shoulder or between the shoulder blades; and shortness of breath. 

Read more: Women and Heart Attacks

   

Teen Social Networking (Part 3 of 3)

Ask the Experts by Mary Beth Garvey (Part 3 of 3)

Q. My middle school and high school children seem hyper-focused on social networking. It seems they have a constant preoccupation with texting, checking their cell phones, and being on the computer. Should I be concerned?

WHAT CAN PARENTS DO? TTYL: Talk Now + Talk Later + Talk Again

Clearly parents are essential in helping our children develop a healthy and productive relationship with technology. This can be nurtured in a number of ways and it begins with talking to your kids about technology the same way you would talk to them about drugs, sex or anything else. Kids listen to parents very closely and will internalize your values and standards if you maintain a healthy and open relationship with your adolescent.

Heres' what to do:

Read more: Teen Social Networking (Part 3 of 3)

 

Teen Social Networking (Part 2 of 3)

Ask the Experts by Mary Beth Garvey (Part 2 of 3)

Q. My middle school and high school children seem hyper-focused on social networking. It seems they have a constant preoccupation with texting, checking their cell phones, and being on the computer. Should I be concerned?

What does this mean for parents? It suggests that we critically attend to the pros and cons of social networking and the impact is has on our unique family composition and personalities. Different children are going to need limits and guidelines tailored to them.

We need to explore how technology and social networking serves our children and what are the pitfalls. Monitoring, education, and limits are critical, but equally as important is safeguarding your connection with your kids, maintaining family time and continuing to establish a trusting relationship based on respect, high expectations and accountability.

Read more: Teen Social Networking (Part 2 of 3)

   

Teen Social Networking (Part 1 of 3)

Ask the Experts by Mary Beth Garvey (Part 1 of 3)

Q. My middle school and high school children seem hyper-focused on social networking. It seems they have a constant preoccupation with texting, checking their cell phones, and being on the computer. Should I be concerned?

A. Though technology is no different than anything else, with its capacity for good and bad, social networking has become a conflict-laden issue for many parents as they struggle to find the balance between setting limits and giving their kids the freedom to explore technology safely. Our children are technology natives: they have never lived during a time when communication, gathering and sharing information, learning, creating and down time wasn't driven in large part by technology.

It is familiar territory for them. The current statistics on teen technology use are startling, and trends suggest a continuing increase in technology use for the future.

Read more: Teen Social Networking (Part 1 of 3)

 

Nearly 400,000 Breakfast Servings for Metro Families Following Successful DMC Children's Hospital of Michigan Cereal Drive Because Hunger Doesn't Take a Summer Vacation

Detroit, Mich., June 14, 2012 - Thousands of children and families will now have breakfast over the summer thanks to an outpouring of community support for DMC Children's Hospital of Michigan Professional Nurse Council's (PNC) Third Annual Cereal Drive. A formula used to convert donated dollars into cereal servings, coupled with boxes of cereal collected netted a total tally of 400,000 servings and solidified DMC Children's Hospital of Michigan winner of the national competition.

The grass roots idea, which began in 2010, snowballed into a spirited competition. Eleven children's hospitals across the United States participated, collectively bringing in more than a million cereal servings for children vulnerable to hunger and malnutrition during the summer months when free or reduced school meals are not available.

Read more: Nearly 400,000 Breakfast Servings for Metro Families Following Successful DMC Children's Hospital of Michigan Cereal Drive Because Hunger Doesn't Take a Summer Vacation

   

"Parents Who Host Lose the Most" campaign

Ask the Experts by Anne Nearhood

Q: Can you tell me about the "Parents Who Host Lose the Most" campaign in our community?

A: Drug-Free Action Alliance has developed the Parents Who Host, Lose The Most: Don't be a party to teenage drinking, a public awareness campaign to provide parents with information about the health risks of underage drinking and the legal consequences of providing alcohol to youth. The campaign encourages parents and the community to send a unified message at prom and graduation time that teen alcohol consumption is not acceptable.

It is illegal, unsafe, and unhealthy for anyone under age 21 to drink alcohol.

Read more: "Parents Who Host Lose the Most" campaign

 

Choosing a Bicycle Helmet

Ask the Experts by Donna Bucciarelli, R.N.

Q: My eight- year-old twins want to ride their bicycles to school. What's the best helmet to buy?

A: You should pick a helmet that fits well, round and smooth on the outside, and has a Consumer Product Safety Commission sticker. A CPSC sticker means that the helmet has been tested and meets the uniform safety standard. If you use an old helmet, make sure it has a seal from one or more of the voluntary bicycle helmet standards such as ASTM, Snell or ANSI.

Read more: Choosing a Bicycle Helmet

   

Is a Professional Caregiver Right for Your Senior Parents?

Ask the Experts by Karen Adair

A group of friends in my book club was sharing conversation about our "sandwiched lives" and had concerns about issues with each of our parents.

Q: Why should I hire an agency to care for my mother when it seems cheaper to hire an aide directly?

A: There are both legal and personal risk issues involved in directly hiring a caregiver. Some things to consider include: criminal and reference checks, tax withholdings, liability and worker's compensation insurance, bonding for personal property theft, and arranging for replacements if the caregiver does not show up for a shift. Professional in-home care companies can alleviate these concerns.

Read more: Is a Professional Caregiver Right for Your Senior Parents?

 

Summer Brain Drain

Ask the Experts by Michael Richman

Q: What does "summer brain drain" mean? 

A. Summer brain drain, also referred to as summer learning loss, is the phenomenon that occurs over the summer when students forget some of what they learned in the prior school year. Most people know that the school year is based on the agricultural cycle. 

Students had their long summer holiday during what was traditionally harvest time. Of course most students in our community no longer work the fields in the summer, but the effect is the same for our students. They forget a significant portion of the material they learned If they are not challenged with some form of learning opportunity.  There has been much written on the subject over the years.

Read more: Summer Brain Drain

   

Breast Feeding

Ask the Experts by Mary Ann Godzwon, R.N.

Q:  I'm pregnant with my first child and deciding if I should breast-feed.

A: Making the choice to breast-feed your new baby is one of the most important decisions you will make as a new mother. Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend breast-feeding as the preferred method of infant nutrition. Breast milk continuously changes and adapts to your baby's needs, creating protection that is customized to your baby on a daily basis, regardless of the age of your baby. The act of breast-feeding itself helps form a close, emotional bond between mom and baby.

Read more: Breast Feeding

 

ChariTea Bear's Tea Party Attendees: Thank You!

"What a fantastic event." "We had such a great time." "The food, the games, the magician, the story time - my daughter was so happy with everything!"

So many moms and dads and grandmothers and aunts made a point of stopping and saying thank you for their afternoon at ChariTea Bear's Tea Party on April 29, 2012. Wow, thanks! Thank you!

Read more: ChariTea Bear's Tea Party Attendees: Thank You!

   

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